Entries in lgbtq (6)

Monday
Dec262016

Publications with LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security 

This month I was fortunate to publish a working paper with the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security as well as a blog. According to their website the Centre is, " a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation for women in conflict-affected situations around the world" and launched last year.

In my Working Paper Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity as Part of the WPS Project I developed 5 policy points from the ideas I wrote about in the International Affairs article "Queering Women, Peace and Security" published earlier this year. The piece was introduced by editors Laura J. Shepherd and Paul Kirby in "The New Politics of Women, Peace and Security."

In a blog post also published by the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security I explore how sexual orientation and gender identity were a part of the Colombia peace negotiations. In the coming months I'll continue to explore this topic in my research for my dissertation and look forward to connecting with LGBTQ organizations in Colombia to learn more about their work on the Colombian peace accords.

As an aside, I'm excited I was able to include an image (included in this post) from the Free & Equal campaign UN For LGBT Equality stamps that were launched in February. Check them out here!

Tuesday
Aug162016

Let's talk about the new independent expert on LGBT issues

This sumemr the UN Human Rights Council voted to appoint a person to look into homophobic and transphobic violence. An important moment! But as you can imagine, there was much maneuvering to even get the appointment and it comes with certain restrictions, not the least of which is a limit to a three year term. In my piece for The Establishment I interview a number of people about the expectations and possibilities riding on the new position from activists and academics alike.

This piece gets at the challenging policy and practice nexus. While there is now policy prioritizing looking at LGBTQ issues, how this translates to practice depends on a number of questions: Who will decide which issues to address with a literal world full off problems to examine? How will local, national and international organizations communicate about these issues? And perhaps the question top of mind right now: who will be appointed as the new independent expert?

The new independent expert will report back to the UN at the end of each year of their term. With that in mind, in a year's time this role may prove an important test in terms of what type of leverage the global human rights community is able to exert for vulnerable LGBTQ individuals around the world. 

 

Thursday
May052016

Queerphobia in a Post Marriage Equality America

As a volunteer on the GLAD Answers hotline where we receve calls from LGBTQ individuals about various forms of discrimination it's all too clear to me how dangerous it is to make assumptions about the progress marriage equality marks in American history for LGBTQ communities. In my first piece for The Establishment I address the larger structures of inequality that remain unaddressed by the marriage equality and point to the many activists who have long spoken out about this topic.

For this story I spoke with the National Center for Lesbian Rights, Sylvia Rivera Law Project and Chase Strangio, Staff Attorney of the ACLU LGBT and HIV Project. I also included videos from DarkMatter, a trans south asian performance art duo I saw perform in Cambridge last month who rocked my damn world.

I also point out in this piece that we can't make any assumptinos about forms of queerphobia (transphobia, biphobia, lesbophobia, homophobia) being on the decline considering the lack of reliable hate-crime statistics dependent on reports from police departments, a place where many queer and trans people do not find it safe to report.

The story was cross-posted over at HuffPost Queer Voices where it was the lead story for a couple of days. People in the comment section on their Facebook page raised some interesting points including the queerphobia within the queer community against trans folks and the rise of hate crimes in general since 9/11.

 

 

Although I haven't read the book yet I learned that Gerald N. Rosenberg's book The Hollow Hope speaks to the concerns of using federal legal reform to make change. The narrative of progress from federal legislation in case after case is called into question in a way that appears to be holding true for queer and trans communities as well.

I anticipate more pieces in the coming months about America as a post marriage equality nation. I hope they will engage in some of the critical questions and concerns raised by activists who have long worked for racial and economic justice.

Wednesday
Dec232015

I finished 2015 writing about a rad photo exhibit

Haven't had much of a chance to do freelance writing this year but fortunately I was able to finish the year with a few pieces about an exhibit that closed earlier this month at the Boston Children's Museum, Mimi's Family. I wrote about the exhibit for The Dig and Nylon.

As I mention in my coverage of the show, I'm eally thrilled to see this sort of opportunity for families to talk about gender and in a way that engages with children! It was fantastic to visit the museum and get a tour of the show with exhibit designer Margaret Middleton as well as and talk to photographer Matthew Clowney about what it was like to hang out with the trans grandparent Erica and her family. 

Recent coverage of the exhibit can also be found at Mombian and The Washington Post.

 

Wednesday
Sep022015

My first book chapter is out!

I'm pleased to note my first book chapter "The Revolutionary Possibilities of Online Trans and Queer Community" is now published! The chapter is part of the book Gender, Sex and Politics: In the Streets and Between the Sheets in the 21st Century. To take a look inside the book, visit the Taylor and Francis website here.

 

 

REVIEWS:

This exciting new book is essential for understanding sexuality and gender in the 21st century. Topics range widely, from sexting to sexual assault. Many chapters are deeply personal, but with broader social implications. This book will stimulate animated conversation and deep thinking; it is one of the most important books on gender and sexuality in the past 30 years.

-Tom Digby, Philosophy, Springfield College, and author of Love and War: How Militarism Shapes Sexuality and Romance

This sparkling book challenges us to pursue fresh critical thinking on feminist issues of exploitation and empowerment, pointing out how we can use constructive dissent rather than destructive disagreement -- a great addition to the canon.

-Loretta Ross, Former National Coordinator, SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective

In our insanely fast-paced, Twitter-trigger world, discussion of sexuality and gender too often consists solely of snarky knee-jerk statements that do nothing to contest dominant thinking. These essays, on the other hand, invite us to think and rethink about power, and for the best reason of all: so that we can equalize it. If you care about gender, sex, and politics, this book is for you.

- Leora Tanenbaum, author of I Am Not a Slut: Slut-Shaming in the Age of the Internet

This is a must read for academic and practical alike and should be in every college sociology and psychology course. The first chapter "Hollaback!" is an eye opener and makes me want to join the movement. The book goes on to unveil many truths we must all face.

-Kristin Beck, US Navy SEAL, Candidate for US Congress 2016

Forty years after the sex wars first captured popular imagination, Shira Tarrant makes it brilliantly clear that sex wars matter anew. In this edgy collection of truth-tellers, contributors invite readers to open their minds, hearts, and conversations. They redefine sexual literacy and challenge the very notion of taboo. Bridging theory, practice, and competing perspectives, the book unsettles and entices. As with the best in gender studies, it’s sure to hit a nerve.

-Deborah Siegel, PhD, author of Sisterhood, Interrupted: From Radical Women to Grrls Gone Wild